Edith Guba

Edith Guba

Edith Guba heads the Dao Yuan School for Qigong, which she founded in Germany together with her teacher, the Chinese Qigong Master Guo Bingsen. The aim of the school was and is the dissemination of traditional Chinese Qigong methods at a level that can maintain their traditional quality.

In their close collaboration, Guo Bingsen and Edith Guba have also translated the Dao De Jing, a fundamental work of Chinese philosophy, into French and German.

Presentation Title: Chinese philosophy, the bond between the theories of Chinese medicine and Qigong
1:30-3:00pm, Sunday 19 May 2019

The teachings of Qi and its correspondences in man and cosmos; of Yin and Yang and their interrelations; of Jing, Shen, Wu Wei: they originate from Chinese philosophy and are the basis of Chinese medicine and Qigong.

Qi circulates in the meridians: both work with them. Both have the goal to dissolve blockades and to regulate the Qi flow. Traditional Chinese Qigong also makes it possible to absorb plenty of Qi from the cosmos while practicing, to transform it into biological Qi, so that it is available for one’s own health and also for sending it out.

When practicing, a lot of saliva can form in the mouth. In the understanding of Qigong this is pure Jing. You swallow it in three swallows up to the lower abdomen. There it is transformed into Qi and is at our disposal to supplement the Qi in the organs and meridians as well as to send it out.

The original qi is located in the kidneys and determines our life expectancy. Qigong stores the absorbed Qi in the Dantian, an area in the lower abdomen, It supplements the Qi in the organs, if this is necessary and prevents us from exhaustion when we send out Qi.

A central instruction of Dao De Jing: “wei wu wei” – “acting without action” can also be applied in Chinese medicine. If there is plenty of Qi, the treatment becomes more relaxed and effective.

These theories correspond to the practice of Qigong and are presented through exercises.

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